International Resolutions 

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An Overview

In this section you will find all articles with the following keywords: »Asylum«, »CO and Asylum«, and »International Resolutions«.

Approaches and challenges for obtaining the status of conscientious objector

(24.05.2019) In the present report, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) builds upon submissions received from stakeholders and on the analytical report submitted by OHCHR to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-fifth session (A/HRC/35/4). It reaffirms briefly the international legal framework outlined in that report, points to some implementation gaps, then provides information on current trends and developments relevant to conscientious objections since 2017. It subsequently outlines different approaches for obtaining the status of conscientious objector to military service and their associated challenges. OHCHR concludes the report by proposing the minimum criteria that should be respected in application procedures for obtaining the status of conscientious objector to military service.

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André Shepherd

Decision of the European Court of Justice in the case of U.S. AWOL soldier André Shepherd

Connection e.V. and PRO ASYL: Much that is negative and little that is positive in the outcome

(26.02.2015) The network for conscientious objection Connection e.V. and PRO ASYL criticize today’s decision by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in the case of U.S. AWOL soldier André Shepherd (37) as insufficient and in part quite incomprehensible in its argumentation. “The ruling by the ECJ does not strengthen the position of conscientious objectors and deserters in political-asylum proceedings. The Court avoided some fundamental questions, and answered others unacceptably, contrary to the opinion submitted by the Advocate-General.” said Rudi Friedrich of Connection e.V.

Conscientious objection: Punishment and discriminatory treatment

(15.05.2014) Not all States recognise the right to conscientious objection; and even where it is recognised in principle, the provisions or the way they are applied may exclude some conscientious objectors. They may face a wide range of serious implications for their refusal to perform military service. Besides prosecution and imprisonment there are many other kinds of discriminatory treatments. Emily Graham of Quaker United Nations office gives an overwiev.

Conscientious objection to military service

Resolution of UN Human Rights Council

(27.09.2013) ... Recognizing that conscientious objection to military service derives from principles and reasons of conscience, including profound convictions, arising from religious, ethical, humanitarian or similar motives, ...