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Turkey: Do not be a supporter of the military deployment to Libya!

(14.01.2020) The Turkish Grand National Assembly approved a bill to deploy troops to Libya on 2 January. This bill fuels the war and internal conflict in Libya. The Turkish government has been taking steps that inflame the war in the eastern Mediterranean region and Libya for a while. With the bill, Turkey is destroying peace. As conscientious objectors and war resisters, we are absolutely against the bill approved by the Turkish Grand National Assembly. We invite everyone to take a stand against it.

Photo: Mari Park, Amnesty International

South Korea: Alternative to military service is new punishment for conscientious objectors

(27.12.2019) Conscientious objectors in South Korea will continue to be punished and stigmatized for refusing military service under a new alternative service law that was adopted today by the country’s parliament, said Amnesty International. Under the new law, those refusing military service on religious or other grounds will be required to work in a jail or other correctional facility for three years. Previously, they would have been jailed for 18 months.

Furkan Çelik

Turkey: Conscientious objector indicted for "alienating the people from the army"

(06.11.2019) Furkan Çelik, Mitglied des Vereins für Kriegsdienstverweigerung (Vicdani Ret Derneği), wurde von der Istanbuler Staatsanwaltschaft wegen „Distanzierung des Volkes vom Militär angeklagt. Die Anklage gegen den Kriegsdienstverweigerer bezieht sich auf den Twitter-Account des Vereins.

Yasmin Ricci-Yahav

Israel: A Conscientious Objector’s Thoughts From a Military Prison

(03.11.2019) In military jail, before the girls know your name, they want to know why you’re there. It’s the first question asked of any girl who joins the complex, and her answer, and more importantly, the way she answers, allows the others to understand something about her. Is she angry or afraid? Does her imprisonment seem justified? Is this her first time in jail, or does she know the way things are run here? Is she staying for a while, is it worth getting to know her? When a girl enters a cell at night, the others sit on their beds and watch her carefully, closely, and try to understand what sort of person is going to share their cell and their lives for the next few days or weeks. But after the customary questions are answered and the girl explains why and how long she is there for, the conversation quickly softens and returns to normal.

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